Erinevus lehekülje "7.The blogosphere: you can be a journalist, too!" redaktsioonide vahel

Allikas: KakuWiki
Mine navigeerimisribaleMine otsikasti
1. rida: 1. rida:
 +
== Blog - diary, journal, magazine ==
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
== History ==
 +
 +
Before the blogs, there were mailing lists and Usenet newsgroups, Fidonet had its network of bulletin board systems (BBS). But even before that, there was the [http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/gate/archive/2001/12/13/commmem.DTL Community Memory] - a terminal-based system running on an [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XDS-940 XDS-940] computer located in San Francisco (active 1972-74). The first and most famous terminal was located in a record store in Berkeley, used an ASR-33 teletype as terminal and was connected to the computer via a 110-baud (10 characters per second) line. The system allowed to leave messages, attach keywords to them and search the messages by keýwords. In essence, this was a very primitive group blog - and it even gave birth to one of the earliest Net personalities called [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benway Benway]. The project was run by four early computing pioneers: Ken Colstad, Mark Szpakowski, Lee Felsenstein and Efrem Lipkin.
 +
 +
 +
 
== Links ==
 
== Links ==
  
 +
FELSENSTEIN, Lee. How Community Memory Came to Be, Part 1. Internaut, Issue #1. [http://oldeee.see.ed.ac.uk/online/internaut/internaut-01/comm.html http://oldeee.see.ed.ac.uk/online/internaut/internaut-01/comm.html].
 
BLOOD, Rebecca. "Weblogs: A History and Perspective", Rebecca's Pocket. 07 September 2000. 05 October 2006. [http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html].
 
BLOOD, Rebecca. "Weblogs: A History and Perspective", Rebecca's Pocket. 07 September 2000. 05 October 2006. [http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html].

Redaktsioon: 25. oktoober 2006, kell 23:04

Blog - diary, journal, magazine

History

Before the blogs, there were mailing lists and Usenet newsgroups, Fidonet had its network of bulletin board systems (BBS). But even before that, there was the Community Memory - a terminal-based system running on an XDS-940 computer located in San Francisco (active 1972-74). The first and most famous terminal was located in a record store in Berkeley, used an ASR-33 teletype as terminal and was connected to the computer via a 110-baud (10 characters per second) line. The system allowed to leave messages, attach keywords to them and search the messages by keýwords. In essence, this was a very primitive group blog - and it even gave birth to one of the earliest Net personalities called Benway. The project was run by four early computing pioneers: Ken Colstad, Mark Szpakowski, Lee Felsenstein and Efrem Lipkin.


Links

FELSENSTEIN, Lee. How Community Memory Came to Be, Part 1. Internaut, Issue #1. http://oldeee.see.ed.ac.uk/online/internaut/internaut-01/comm.html. BLOOD, Rebecca. "Weblogs: A History and Perspective", Rebecca's Pocket. 07 September 2000. 05 October 2006. http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html.